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Study sheds light on how ovarian cancer spreads

A team of researchers is studying the molecular mechanisms by which ovarian cancer spreads -- or metastasizes -- to uncover new therapeutic opportunities.

Directed gene-copy variation: The key to conquering new environments

A study of yeast reveals new mechanism that allows cells to adapt to environmental changes more rapidly by accelerating genetic changes around genes that boost fitness.

Training changes the way the brain pays attention

Behavioral training changes the way attention facilitates information processing in the human brain, a study has found.

High-tech CityTree cleans as much pollution as 275 trees (Video)

This piece of solar-powered urban furniture cleans air, collects rainwater and also doubles as a living billboard.

Lake harvests are likely more fruitful than we knew

Harvests from freshwater fisheries such as the Great Lakes could total more than 12 million tons a year globally and contribute more to global food supplies and economies than previous estimates indicate, according to a study.

Slow motion makes soccer referees more likely to give a red card

Video assistant refereeing in soccer has to be used with caution. Researchers have shown that refs are more likely to give red when they see a foul committed in slow motion, even when a yellow card is more justifiable. This is because fouls viewed in slow motion appear to be more serious.

Researchers discover novel colistin resistance gene mcr-3 in Escherichia coli

A new mobile colistin resistance gene, mcr-3, has been discovered in E. coli of pig origin. The novel mcr-3 gene was discovered when a colistin-resistant Escherichia coli isolate tested negative for both mcr-1 and mcr-2. This novel mobile colistin resistance gene may already be widely disseminated. Screening for the mcr-3 gene should be urgently included in the surveillance of colistin-resistant Gram-negative pathogens from animals, humans, and the environment.

Intracranial pathology not necessary for gadolinium deposition in brain tissues

New research suggests gadolinium retention may be more widespread and may be present in many more, or possibly all, patients exposed to gadolinium-based contrast agents, according to new research.

Amber warning for the UK’s access to new medicines post Brexit

A new study explores the consequences of a British exit from the European Medicines Agency as a result of Brexit, and what this will mean for pharmaceutical regulation and future access to medicines for UK citizens.

Could humans ever regenerate a heart? A new study suggests the answer is ‘yes’

A new study's findings point to potential for tweaking communication between human genes and advancing our ability to treat heart conditions and stimulate regenerative healing. Next Page »

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